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Logic & Scientific Philosophy

If a tree falls in a forest logic – Leon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/If_a_tree_falls_in_a_forest

When trees fall they make a sound

Humans can hear sounds

/Human can hear a tree fall

“If a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear, does it make a sound?” is a classic philosophical thought experiment. It is use to raise questions about reality and observation. This question all started from the philosopher George Berkeley in his work called “A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge”.

The format of this would be:

X makes Y

Z hears Y

/Z hears X

Everything has and/or makes a sound, it doesn’t matter if there someone is there or not to hear it. This argument is valid but is it factually correct? Sort of in my opinion. It’s not factually correct because if no one is there to hear it, how would they know if it fell in the first place. On the other hand, like I said before everything makes a sound. The real question was that does a tree make a sound when it falls, it didn’t matter if no one is there to hear it still makes a sound. I would say yes to the question but the argument itself isn’t factually correct. Some people is the world who can’t hear so how would they hear it fall. Other people may think differently, on the Wikipedia page it shows the other people opinions and perspective. In the end, the argument is valid but not factually correct in my opinion, which makes this not sound.

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Discussion

2 thoughts on “If a tree falls in a forest logic – Leon

  1. Hi Leon,

    I have to say after reading your post, I am definitely still confused on the whole tree in the forest thing. From looking at your argument, I would agree that the whole concept is based on and individuals opinion. However, factually, I do believe this argument is correct if some words were added.

    When trees fall they make a sound (True)

    Humans can hear sounds (Somewhat true)

    /Human can hear a tree fall (Somewhat true)

    If we take this argument and add a few words we can get this:

    When trees fall they make a sound (True)

    The majority of humans can hear sounds (True)

    /The majority of humans can hear a tree fall (True)

    Using this second argument, I believe this would become sound because no where does it mention that a human is not around to hear the tree fall.

    What do you think?

    By the way, I love how you use a philosophical question to break down into an argument to decipher logic in philosophy class. Very…poetic or ironic. 🙂

    Aman

    Posted by amanmonkey | September 30, 2013, 7:19 am
    • Hi! Yeah the question is confusing and I guess I didn’t do to great of explaining it. And yes I could have made the argument more clearer, I guess I never really thought about that at the time. Thanks for the feedback!

      Posted by lchai96 | September 30, 2013, 6:25 pm

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